Food Science

Scientists Are Redesigning Grocery Stores to Help You Eat Healthier — Food News

What will it take for people to consume more vegetables? Scientists are exploring this exact point in a very specific location: the aisles of grocery stores. Researchers at the University of Oxford are working with British supermarket chain Sainsbury's to see if redesigning the store can nudge consumers to purchase more fruits and vegetables.

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The Science Behind Why Alcohol Makes You Eat More — Food News

There's really nothing better than a slice of cheap pizza after you've had a little too much to drink. And the anecdotal evidence is strong: Anyone who has had too much alcohol can vouch for the desire to nosh on some snacks. It turns out that scientists even have a name for this specific desire: the apéritif effect.

While you might accredit increased hunger on diminished self-restraint that comes with drinking booze, science has a different answer that might surprise you.

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Is Breakfast Really All That Important? — Great Debates

Welcome to the Great Debates, where we consider the greatest nutritional controversies of our time. Our goal isn't to tell you what to think or do, but rather to present both sides of hot-button issues, like coffee (is it good for you?) and breakfast (the most important meal of the day?). What's being said? Who's saying it? Then it's up to you to make your own decisions.

Breakfast — the cornerstone of a healthy diet, or optional morning meal? For generations, we have been told breakfast is the most important meal of the day. A good breakfast jump-starts your metabolism! Breakfast improves academic performance! Breakfast is the key to weight loss! Breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper, the saying goes.

Except that newer research suggests … maybe none of that is true? It's not that more recent findings showed that breakfast is bad; just that maybe breakfast is fine. But can it be true that the morning meal offers no morning-meal-specific magic?

Like certain bran cereals served without milk, this unsettling revelation is hard to swallow, especially for those of us who have spent a lifetime choking down whole-grain toast at 7 a.m. And so, in the spirit of scientific inquiry, let us examine the evidence.

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Here’s the Science Behind That Ham Photo Everyone Is Freaking Out About — Food News

(Image credit: Reddit)

The first optical illusion of the year has arrived, courtesy of a Reddit user who shared a blurry image of sliced deli ham under the Mildly Interesting subreddit. While we're all pretty sick of hearing about the next "The Dress," this ham photo caught our attention. I mean, just look at it!

We need to know: Is the image really blurry or is it a bunch of thin slices of ham, shot in focus, creating the illusion of a blurry image?

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This Is the Best Way to Get Ketchup Out of the Bottle, Says Science — Food News

French-fry lovers of the world can breathe a collective sigh of relief, because scientists have finally figured out the best way to get ketchup out of the bottle. Dr. Anthony Stickland of the University of Melbourne explains his findings in the university's website, Pursuit, by accepting that ketchup isn't a liquid, but rather a "soft solid," like toothpaste.

Many condiments, like mayonnaise, are also soft solids and these substances do not follow Newton's law of viscosity. You see, the tomato solids are suspended in liquid and in order to get the ketchup out of the bottle, the would-be diner must overcome the ketchup's physical strength that comes from the solids touching each other. That strength resists motion, which is why it's occasionally difficult to get ketchup out of a glass bottle.

Still confused? Here's how to get the job done.

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Scientists Are Trying To Make Kale Taste Better — On Trend

Kale may be a celebrated superfood, but it's not as popular as you might think. According to Zagat's 2015 National Dining Trends Survey, only 27 percent of diners in America reported liking the plant. For the remaining 73 percent, there's some good news in store: Plant researchers at Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Science are working on creating a version that is more appealing to American palates.

<p><a href='http://www.thekitchn.com/scientists-are-trying-to-make-kale-taste-better-239189'><strong>READ MORE »</strong></a></p>
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